Tangelo Curd

Sweet with a light citrus tang, Tangelo curd is a seasonal delight you’ll want to have in your fridge. It makes delicious little dessert tarts, can be dolloped onto or spread over cakes, and is great to add into breakfast parfaits too.

A hand is holding a small jar of bright orange tangelo curd. In the background are dainty pink flowers and thumbprint cookies with some of the orange curd in the middle.Pin

What Are Tangelos

Tangelos are a hybrid fruit that are a cross between mandarins or tangerines and pomelos or grapefruit. The variety we have here in Aus is called Minneola, which is a tangerine grapefruit cross.

If you’ve never had one, they taste a lot like a mandarin, an orange, and a ruby grapefruit combined. They’re sweet, with a little tang and they’re incredibly juicy too.

The distinct shape of tangelos – orange like with a knob at the end – makes them easy to spot. They’re easy to peel like mandarins but are heavier due to the volume of juice they contain.

Two bright orange tangelos are sitting on a grey table. Tangelos are a citrus fruit that look like an orange but are distinctive for the way they taper towards the end of the fruit that was attached to the tree.Pin

Ingredients Needed For Tangelo Curd

Tangelos are a mid-winter to mid-spring fruit so July to October is when you’ll find them. If they’re out of season or you can’t find them where you are, oranges will work just fine too.

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  • Egg yolks – Give this curd its thick and rich finish.
  • Tangelo juice – Contributes to the curd’s lovely sweetness and that touch of tanginess.
  • Tangelo zest – This intensifies the tangelo/citrus flavour and I leave it in rather than strain it out at the end. I don’t find it makes the curd bitter at all.
  • Butter or coconut oil – I’ve only used a small amount in comparison to some other curd recipes. This is so the fat doesn’t mask the fruitiness of the tangelo. If you’re using coconut oil, it does change the flavour profile a touch. You get citrus and coconut notes in this kind of curd, but I think it’s equally delicious.
  • Honey – This adds plenty of sweetness but is also a perfect match for the tangelo. It helps to make it a very luscious curd.

This tangelo curd, like many fruit curds, has a custard-like consistency, which I prefer chilled. With this in mind, whilst you can eat this as soon as it’s done, I suggest popping it in the fridge for about an hour before using it. This also helps to thicken it up further.

How To Make This Tangelo Curd

I always used to think curds were so difficult to make. They’re really not though. However, you do need to ensure your pan is on a low heat, and that you stir often so the eggs don’t overcook. If you don’t you’ll have bits of scrambled egg all throughout your curd.

  1. Separate the eggs and put the yolks in a small saucepan (keep the whites to make meringue or an omelette with).
  2. Whisk the four yolks until they’re just combined.
  3. Add in the 1/3 cup honey, 60g/2oz butter or coconut oil, as well as the 100ml/3.5 fl oz tangelo juice and 2 teaspoons of zest.
  4. Turn the heat to low and start to stir everything with a wooden spoon. Keep stirring constantly until the curd thickens and will coat the back of the spoon. This was about 12-15 minutes for me. It may take longer if using coconut oil.
  5. Allow the curd to cool slightly, pour into jars and put in the fridge to set. This will take about an hour.
  6. This will make roughly 220ml / just a touch under half a pint.

I love to use this tangelo curd in breakfast parfaits or to dollop on cookies. That being said, it’s great in so many things. Use it as a slice topping, a cake filling, have it with scones… the list goes on.

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FAQ

How long will citrus curd keep?

Most citrus curds, including this one, will keep in the fridge for up to one month. It’s quite a small batch so it should be well and truly gone in that time. If you do find you have some left, it can be frozen and defrosted when needed.

What are fruit curds used for?

They can be used for just about anything. I find this curd a perfect cake filling, I use a little in breakfast parfaits, you can make trifle with it, or use it to stuff some small (or one large) tart shell with. They’re delicious dolloped on scones or cookies too.

Watch How To Make This Tangelo Curd

This is a square image of a hand holding a small jar of bright orange tangelo curd. In the background are dainty pink flowers and thumbprint cookies with some of the tangelo curd in the middle.Pin

Tangelo Curd

Sweet with a light citrus tang, Tangelo curd is a seasonal delight you'll want to have plenty of in your fridge. Recipe video is above!
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Course: Dessert, Spreads
Cuisine: Australian
Keyword: Curd, Tangelo curd
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 12 minutes
Cooling time (optional): 1 hour
Total Time: 17 minutes
Servings: 4 people
Calories: 992kcal

Equipment

  • 1 Small saucepan

Ingredients

  • 4 egg yolks
  • 100 ml tangelo juice, strained (about 1 large or 2 medium tangelos)
  • 2 tsp tangelo zest (about one tangelo)
  • 60 g butter or coconut oil (see notes if using coconut oil)
  • 1/3 cup honey

Instructions

  • Separate the eggs and put the yolks in a small saucepan (keep the whites to make meringues or an omelette with).
  • Whisk the yolks until they're just combined.
  • Add in the honey, butter or coconut oil, as well as the tangelo juice and zest.
  • Place the saucepan over a low heat on the stove and start to stir everything with a wooden spoon.
  • Keep stirring constantly until the curd thickens and will coat the back of the spoon. This was about 12-15 minutes for me.
  • Remove from the heat, allow the curd to cool slightly, pour into one large or two small jars and put in the fridge to set. This will take about an hour. The recipe yields roughly 200ml curd (a little less than half a pint).

Notes

DO NOT allow the mix to simmer or boil at any time or your you’ll get bits of cooked/scrambled egg all throughout your curd. Stirring constantly right to the bottom of the pan will ensure this doesn’t happen.
* If using coconut oil you may find it takes longer for the curd to thicken. Mine took 25-30mins over a low heat. 

Nutrition

Serving: 20g | Calories: 992kcal | Carbohydrates: 106g | Protein: 10g | Fat: 63g | Saturated Fat: 36g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 4g | Monounsaturated Fat: 19g | Trans Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 712mg | Sodium: 417mg | Potassium: 318mg | Fiber: 0.4g | Sugar: 103g | Vitamin A: 2542IU | Vitamin C: 31mg | Calcium: 110mg | Iron: 2mg

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10 Comments

  1. 5 stars
    I’ve never seen a tangelo but they look so juicy. I love spreads like this – so delicious on toast, ice cream or in little tarts. Thanks for sharing.

  2. 5 stars
    I was looking for a citrusy curd to add to a pavlova for a party this weekend, and this looks sooo good. I may try this recipe using oranges, as it seems tangelos aren’t widely available here in the UK. Thanks for the recipe 🙂

    1. This works just as well with oranges Beth! But I can recommend trying a tangelo if you ever come across them. They’re so juicy, and have such a lovely flavour.